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Me pega con violencia

A year and a half in Honduras has seemed to fly by. Was it just 12 months ago that I was pondering the phrase “Me pega con violencia.” Which translates literally to “It hit me with violence.” What or who would hit them, I pondered? And with violence!? Is this a cultural thing that I don’t know about? Do Hondurans regularly commit violence against others or themselves, or is this maybe another form of self mutilation that I don’t know about? Is this person even stable?

I found out eventually that this is also a phrase used to describe an episode of vertigo! While I was wondering why someone would hit my patient, she was actually just trying to tell me that she had dizziness.

The past week has been an average one, and thanks to the suggestion of my Mom, I jotted down all the patients that I had seen in clinic this Friday in order to better remember in the future about our time and roll here. Here are a few snapshots:

One 18 year old had been suffering for the past 3 years with horrible joint pain that had limited her role and function at home. She couldn’t cook, fold clothes, and had trouble writing due to the pain in her hands. This follow up visit was three months after we started her on a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis. She was smiling and talking about how she could work in her home normally now. She excitedly wiggled her fingers showing me how she moved them without pain, and even demonstrated that she can remove her rings- as before her fingers were too swollen to get them off.


Mini van turned ambulence parked outside of the Hospital

Another 50 year old women had complained of chronic diarrhea for 8 months and after a multitude of tests and treatments that weren’t successful, came to our hospital seeking a second opinion. After a short conversation, some lab tests, and a chat with another physician we figured out that it was her diabetes that was causing the issues- not some rare tropical disease. Friday was her follow up appointment, and she was pleased to report that the past week was the first time in 8 months she had pooped normally. She rightly praised God for this work in her body.

A 68 year old female being evaluated for postmenopauseal bleeding, obtained a biopsy of her endocervcical lining… biopsy results are still pending.

A 57 year old woman with a year history of fevers, tonsillitis, and throat pain that had a huge tonsilith (a type of stone that can grow and develop in your tonsil and cause bad breath if its small… or pain if it is large). It was removed in hopes that this will prevent any more tonsillitis.


New solar panels on the roof of housing at the hospital help keep high electricity costs manageable. 

And an elderly woman who was following up for her hypertension and gastritis that praised the hospital because at a previous visit she obtained an eye exam and was given reading glasses. “Now I can read the small print in my bible!” she said excitedly.

Each visit is a blessing to see how this hospital provides care for patients, as much of this care is difficult to find elsewhere in the country at a price that is affordable for the patients and that also points them toward Christ. Thank you for allowing us to be a part of this ministry and walking alongside us.

Big Announcement!

Andrew and I have prayerfully considered our initial two year commitment and feel God’s leading us to extend our time in Honduras 1.5 years more until April 2020. We have been challenged by hospital leadership to continue our roll in the hospital to keep seeing patients and be involved in our local community. As much as it is difficult to be away from family gatherings, birthday parties, weddings, and chick fil a, we are confident that the Lord would have us stay here for at least a little while longer doing His work in Honduras.  We are thankful for your continued partnership in ministry in Honduras and hope that you will consider continuing to partner with us until April 2020 both prayerfully and financially.

Original Blog date: July 24, 2018

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